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Computer History Museum

Computer History Museum Uses Interactive Transcripts to Make Videos Searchable and Accessible

What Is Computer History Museum, and How Do They Use Online Video?

Computer History Museum is a non-profit that provides a space to revel in the groundbreaking developments and artifacts of the Information Age. With exhibits that cover the nearly 2,000-year-old history of computers (who knew, right?), the Museum also hosts audio and video recordings that tell the stories of computer and technology pioneers. In an effort to make their recordings more accessible, Computer History Museum uses online video to share their incredible histories with a modern audience. In this day and age, online video is an inevitability for most organizations, and particularly so for one that details the technological advancements of computers. Online video was not only a logical progression for Computer History Museum, but a necessary one.

Why Is It So Important for Computer History Museum to Transcribe Its Recordings?

The main issue with oral content, and therefore with online video, is the impracticality of using it for research purposes. Computer History Museum is aware that research brings in a large portion of its audience, and in an effort to make its content accessible and searchable, it has created video transcripts for over 400 of its approximately 600 recordings. However, just as searchability is lost with audio and video content, important qualities like emotion, personality, and expression are sacrificed with written transcription.

Why Did They Decide to Implement Interactive Transcripts?

Given the imperfection of either one of these options (videos or transcripts), Computer History Museum has branched out into a very new technology: the interactive transcript, created by 3Play Media. Perhaps it is fitting for an organization that details moments in computer innovation to present their histories using the latest video technology! With interactive transcripts, the text version of their videos’ oral content is synced to the video version. Essentially, interactive transcripts allow Computer History Museum to have the best of both worlds: the search and research functionality of written transcripts with the unique, personal factor that video brings to the table. Plus, 3Play Media’s integration with YouTube has simplified the transcription workflow. Computer History Museum is thrilled at the opportunities that interactive transcripts have brought not only to their organization, but also to researchers and interested viewers of computer history.

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