To have someone interpret for me requires an awful lot of trust. An immense amount of trust. Sometimes I feel like I just want to push that interpreter out of the way and do it myself. 

It sucks, but I'm used to it. How else can I get my message across? I don't really have a choice.”

Read more of Crystal's story >>

“I had two records in the top 100 on the charts, and I had a number one record in Brazil.

Suddenly an air horn, like on a boat, went off in the left ear. It was probably a blood vessel bursting. A year and a half later -- right ear.

No music for 35 years.

Read more of Stu's story >>

“My third grade teacher was trying to keep separate two other kids in the class. And these two other kids apparently were signing to each other. They come from Deaf families, so their first language was sign language. And they were basically talking to each other during class, essentially cheating or playing around, goofing around, not paying attention.

And I was the way to keep them apart by being actually put right in the middle of them during third grade. And just like you would have neighbors who might speak Spanish or a different language just by proximity, I started to pick up American sign language.”

Read more of Chris' story >>

"...Deaf culture is a more collectivist culture apart from our hearing American culture, where we are very much individualistic. Everyone really picks each other up."

Read more of Gage's story >>

“I loved how my favorite YouTuber just started using captioning in her videos. And it's like, oh, my gosh. You're using captions! I even posted to Facebook-- oh, my gosh. She's using captions.

And she made a Facebook post and said, 'I'm aware of you, my hard-of-hearing unicorns.' And it was like, oh, my god.

Read more of Lena's story >>

Have you ever felt like there was a miscommunication?

“Always. I think I started to realize it when I was in middle school. I was in a group of friends. And they all decided that they didn't want to be friends anymore because I never talked. Because I was a quiet person.

And they said, you can't be friends with us anymore because we don't know who you are.

Read more of Alicia's story >>

What is the best thing about being deaf?

“Seeing the world. It's a visual world. I love it. I think about it every day.

I feel blessed to be deaf. I just couldn't imagine not being deaf.

Read more of Nia's story >>

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Faces Behind the Screen is a storytelling project focusing on communities that benefit from a more accessible web.

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"[When people annoy me] I just turn off my hearing aids."

Read more of Kevin's story >>


"...Deaf culture is a more collectivist culture apart from our hearing American culture, where we are very much individualistic. Everyone really picks each other up."

Read more of Gage' story >>

"[When people annoy me] I just turn off my hearing aids."

Read more of Kevin's story >>

FACES BEHIND THE SCREEN

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"The way [my parents] looked at it was, ‘you’ve got a timer on, and just push this really hard towards your [musical] goals.’"

Read more of Zoë's story >>

"Every time I see a movie without captions, I feel like they’re doing something wrong."

Read more of Mohammed's story >>

"I’ll never forget it. I walked into the [convention] with my bags... and there were hundreds of people with hearing loss, talking to each other, and reading their programs, and planning their schedules, and which seminars were they going to go to. And I burst into tears. I was thinking about my mother, and how this is what she needed... what would have made her life so much better. And I knew that, for myself, it was going to be OK. I’ve got this."

Read more of Peggy's story >>

"If I didn’t see people, I didn’t hear them."

Read more of Sandy's story >>

"My experience working as a Deaf actress has been amazing. I have been blessed to be able to show authenticity in my roles as to what real Deaf/hard of hearing people are going through in their everyday lives. More importantly, the actual depiction of Deaf and hard of hearing people can be seen as having the same issues as those that are hearing, both good and bad. For instance, Master of None — I was able to portray situations that I, personally, deal with daily. We really aren’t any different. The only thing we can’t do is hear."

Read more of Treshelle's story >>

What is the best thing about being deaf? 

"I hear screaming/crying babies less. Unfortunately, sometimes, I can still hear them depending on how close they are, but for the most part, the sound is less for me than it would be a hearing person. Sorry, babies. I understand why you cry, but it hurts." 

Read more of Rikki's story >>

"My parents are both deaf, and ASL was my first language. English is actually a second language for me. 

In our family we had a footstool that would sit by the TV, and that was the interpreter's footstool because we didn't have closed captioning back then. Growing up there was the Vietnam War, and that [was] the first war that was really televised. So I would sit on the footstool next to the TV and interpret the news and update Mom and Dad."

Read more of Scott's story >>

"My parents are both deaf, and ASL was my first language. English is actually a second language for me. 

In our family we had a footstool that would sit by the TV, and that was the interpreter's footstool because we didn't have closed captioning back then. Growing up there was the Vietnam War, and that [was] the first war that was really televised. So I would sit on the footstool next to the TV and interpret the news and update Mom and Dad."

Read more of Scott's story >>

“I loved how my favorite YouTuber just started using captioning in her videos. And it's like, oh, my gosh. You're using captions! I even posted to Facebook-- oh, my gosh. She's using captions.

And she made a Facebook post and said, 'I'm aware of you, my hard-of-hearing unicorns.' And it was like, oh, my god.

Read more of Lena's story >>

To have someone interpret for me requires an awful lot of trust. An immense amount of trust. Sometimes I feel like I just want to push that interpreter out of the way and do it myself. 

It sucks, but I'm used to it. How else can I get my message across? I don't really have a choice.”

Read more of Crystal's story >>

“I had two records in the top 100 on the charts, and I had a number one record in Brazil.

Suddenly an air horn, like on a boat, went off in the left ear. It was probably a blood vessel bursting. A year and a half later -- right ear.

No music for 35 years.

Read more of Stu's story >>

“I had two records in the top 100 on the charts, and I had a number one record in Brazil.

Suddenly an air horn, like on a boat, went off in the left ear. It was probably a blood vessel bursting. A year and a half later -- right ear.

No music for 35 years.

Read more of Stu's story >>

"My parents are both deaf, and ASL was my first language. English is actually a second language for me. 

In our family we had a footstool that would sit by the TV, and that was the interpreter's footstool because we didn't have closed captioning back then. Growing up there was the Vietnam War, and that [was] the first war that was really televised. So I would sit on the footstool next to the TV and interpret the news and update Mom and Dad."

Read more of Scott's story >>

"As a kid, I was doing for free what people who are professionals – who were trained – get paid to do."

Read more of Tamara's story >>

"I feel like I’m breaking barriers. And I really want to just get involved and work and open up those doors, so that more and more Deaf, hard of hearing, disabled actors of any sort will be able to get their foot in the door and have work in TV, film, and stage. If that’s their passion, that’s their dream, they have the right to make their dreams come true. And I want people to be sensitive enough to include those people at the table."

Read more of CJ's story >>

To have someone interpret for me requires an awful lot of trust. An immense amount of trust. Sometimes I feel like I just want to push that interpreter out of the way and do it myself. 

It sucks, but I'm used to it. How else can I get my message across? I don't really have a choice.”

Read more of Crystal's story >>

"...Deaf culture is a more collectivist culture apart from our hearing American culture, where we are very much individualistic. Everyone really picks each other up."

Read more of Gage's story >>

“My third grade teacher was trying to keep separate two other kids in the class. And these two other kids apparently were signing to each other. They come from Deaf families, so their first language was sign language. And they were basically talking to each other during class, essentially cheating or playing around, goofing around, not paying attention.

And I was the way to keep them apart by being actually put right in the middle of them during third grade. And just like you would have neighbors who might speak Spanish or a different language just by proximity, I started to pick up American sign language.”

Read more of Chris' story >>

“I had two records in the top 100 on the charts, and I had a number one record in Brazil.

Suddenly an air horn, like on a boat, went off in the left ear. It was probably a blood vessel bursting. A year and a half later -- right ear.

No music for 35 years.

Read more of Stu's story >>

"I love being deaf. I wouldn’t change that for the world. People ask me, would you do it over? Would you want to be born hearing? I’m like, no, because I appreciate things a lot more being deaf. And it’s nice to be able to shut out the world if I have to. I think the best part of being deaf is that I get to see the world in a different way. I love my mornings where I don’t have to put my ears in yet. I just go about my routine, and it’s just a different world for me. Just my own little world. I love that. It’s my favorite part of my day."

Read more of Anna's story >>

"Hard of hearing, they think you can talk a little louder. Talking a little louder isn't going to necessarily help."

Read more of Sue's story >>


"Hearing loss is sometimes invisible, and don’t assume that just because someone gets a hearing aid or CI [implant] that it’s fixed -- because we are still deaf or hearing impaired. [The technology is] a miracle, but at the same time don’t assume that it’s going to fix it."

Read more of Liz's story >>


"If I didn’t see people, I didn’t hear them."

Read more of Sandy's story >>

"Every time I see a movie without captions, I feel like they’re doing something wrong."

Read more of Mohammed's story >>


"My blog is a place where I can communicate everything that I have experienced while living with hearing loss, and it’s also a place for other people who have lived or continue to live with what I have, to feel accompanied and to understand that they are not alone. For me, the solitude I felt during my silence was what affected me the most."

Read more of Lilian's story >>

Version en español >>


"I remember playing telephone and noticing that I had to completely turn so they’d talk in my good ear."

Read more of Betsy's story >>


"My blog is a place where I can communicate everything that I have experienced while living with hearing loss, and it’s also a place for other people who have lived or continue to live with what I have, to feel accompanied and to understand that they are not alone. For me, the solitude I felt during my silence was what affected me the most."

Read more of Lilian's story >>

Version en español >>

"Hard of hearing, they think you can talk a little louder. Talking a little louder isn't going to necessarily help."

Read more of Sue's story >>

"I feel like I’m breaking barriers. And I really want to just get involved and work and open up those doors, so that more and more Deaf, hard of hearing, disabled actors of any sort will be able to get their foot in the door and have work in TV, film, and stage. If that’s their passion, that’s their dream, they have the right to make their dreams come true. And I want people to be sensitive enough to include those people at the table."

Read more of CJ's story >>

"My experience working as a Deaf actress has been amazing. I have been blessed to be able to show authenticity in my roles as to what real Deaf/hard of hearing people are going through in their everyday lives. More importantly, the actual depiction of Deaf and hard of hearing people can be seen as having the same issues as those that are hearing, both good and bad. For instance, Master of None — I was able to portray situations that I, personally, deal with daily. We really aren’t any different. The only thing we can’t do is hear."

Read more of Treshelle's story >>

"I’ll never forget it. I walked into the [convention] with my bags... and there were hundreds of people with hearing loss, talking to each other, and reading their programs, and planning their schedules, and which seminars were they going to go to. And I burst into tears. I was thinking about my mother, and how this is what she needed... what would have made her life so much better. And I knew that, for myself, it was going to be OK. I’ve got this."

Read more of Peggy's story >>

Have you ever felt like there was a miscommunication?

“Always. I think I started to realize it when I was in middle school. I was in a group of friends. And they all decided that they didn't want to be friends anymore because I never talked. Because I was a quiet person.

And they said, you can't be friends with us anymore because we don't know who you are.

Read more of Alicia's story >>

Can you give one piece of advice?

"Love yourself. It’s hard to do. But worth it."

Read more of Lisa's story >>